Archive | Kenya

RSS feed for this section

Mapping the Financial Flow and Expenditures for Select MNCH Medicines in Kenya

Since the report of the United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC) was published in 2012, much has been done to highlight the challenges countries face in ensuring the availability of essential commodities and to create resources to assist countries in this endeavor. In most settings, these commodities are procured with government funds, but there is a lack of documented evidence as to how decisions regarding financing for these commodities are made and executed. An understanding of the financial flows for MNCH commodities is critical as countries pursue the goals of ending preventable child and maternal deaths and of universal health coverage and as many go through the process of decentralization. Understanding financial flows for MNCH commodities may also assist the donor community in making smarter investments and assisting countries in mobilizing additional resources. SIAPS conducted an assessment of subnational procurement practices in Kenya. One component of that assessment is related to understanding the financial flows for MNCH commodities.

Read full story · Comments are closed

Challenges to Ensuring Adequate and Timely Funding for MNCH Commodities

As countries pursue the maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) targets established under Sustainable Development Goal 3, they will need to ensure the continuous availability of essential health commodities to prevent and treat the conditions that cause morbidity and mortality in those groups. Since the report of the United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC) was published in 2012, much progress has been made to highlight the challenges countries face in ensuring access to essential commodities and to create resources to overcome these challenges. A major issue yet to be adequately addressed is financing for these life-saving commodities. SIAPS mapped the budget allocation, approval, disbursement, and reporting processes in the public sector for essential MNCH commodities in four countries—
Bangladesh, Kenya, Nepal, and Uganda—to inform the development of strategies and
interventions that will improve access to these commodities.

Read full story · Comments are closed

Assessing Sub-National Procurement Practices of Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Commodities in Kenya

The SIAPS Program works at both the global and country levels to improve pharmaceutical management systems that increase access to quality medicines. SIAPS has developed a methodology to assess sub-national procurement practices. This methodology was used in Kenya to assess county-level procurement practices for essential maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) commodities and to study the availability of essential MNCH commodities. The information gathered was used to generate recommendations to strengthen local procurement practices and overall procurement strategies.

Read full story · Comments are closed

In the news: Defeating Malaria through Pharmaceutical Systems Strengthening

SIAPS’ role to control malaria was recently featured in Health & Humanitarian: The Supply Chain Review. Between 2000 and 2015, malaria case incidences declined by 41% and mortality rates by 62%. However, approximately 212 million people were infected and 429,000 people died in 2015, with the majority being children under the age of 5 in […]

Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Defeating malaria through pharmaceutical systems strengthening

SIAPS has received funding from the US President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) to work in eight countries—Angola, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan—to strengthen pharmaceutical systems for improved malaria control. This report synthesizes the pharmaceutical systems strengthening efforts of SIAPS and documents how the approach was used to support efforts to control malaria.

Read full story · Comments are closed

Defeating malaria through pharmaceutical systems strengthening: A review of SIAPS’s activities in eight countries

SIAPS recently published the results of its activities in eight countries (Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan) to control malaria. This report summarizes systems strengthening interventions that support the prevention and treatment of malaria. With funding from the US President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) and based […]

Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Implementing QuanTB to Improve Forecasting, Supply Planning, and Early Warning Systems for TB Medicines: Kenya Report

SIAPS conducted an evaluation of its TB technical assistance and the QuanTB implementation in Kenya. Specific objectives were to determine:

  • Key achievements or results of the SIAPS QuanTB technical assistance in Kenya
  • Experiences and perspectives of the beneficiaries of the NTLD-P
  • Challenges and lessons learned

This report summarizes key aspects and results of the analysis for Kenya.

Read full story · Comments are closed

The Economic Cost of Non-adherence to TB Medicines Resulting from Stock-outs and Loss to Follow-up in Kenya – Research Summary

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, which is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence results in increased length and severity of illness, death, disease transmission, and drug resistance. Treatment interruption is often due to patient-related factors—classed as loss to follow-up (LTFU)—but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of medicines. The purpose of this study was to estimate the morbidity, mortality, and economic impact of TB treatment interruption due to stock-outs and LTFU. The results are expected to help promote the benefits of ensuring the availability of good quality medicines and of undertaking interventions to reduce LTFU.

For the full report, please follow this link.

Read full story · Comments are closed

The Economic Cost of Non-adherence to TB Medicines Resulting from Stock-outs and Loss to Follow-up in Kenya

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, which is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence results in increased length and severity of illness, death, disease transmission, and drug resistance. Treatment interruption is often due to patient-related factors—classed as loss to follow-up (LTFU)—but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of medicines. The purpose of this study was to estimate the morbidity, mortality, and economic impact of TB treatment interruption due to stock-outs and LTFU. The results are expected to help promote the benefits of ensuring the availability of good quality medicines and of undertaking interventions to reduce LTFU.

For the research summary, please follow this link.

Read full story · Comments are closed

Estimating the In-Country Distribution Costs of Malaria Commodities in Benin and Kenya

This report estimates the cost of the Kenyan and Beninese distribution networks for artemisininbased combination therapies (ACTs) and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in the public sector. Based on this work, we created an extrapolative model to allow donors and country budget planners to quickly and effectively estimate distribution costs for country roadmaps. This model is presented in a separate document.

This report achieved four objectives: (1) allow accurate costing for the delivery of malaria commodities to the end user, (2) allow accurate planning and budgeting, (3) provide realistic estimates of distribution costs for inclusion in roadmaps and proposals, and (4) inform policy discussion by improving the accuracy of costing for ACT and RDT supply chains.

Read full story · Comments are closed