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Adopting the Pharmacovigilance Monitoring System for the Philippines National Tuberculosis Program

The Department of Health-Pharmaceutical Division (DOH-PD) and National TB Program (NTP) in the Philippines adopted the web‐based application Pharmacovigilance Monitoring System (PViMS) to ensure systematic data collection and simplify the analysis of medicine safety information. PViMS is a free web tool developed by SIAPS to help clinicians, regulatory bodies, and implementing partners monitor medicine safety, specifically in resource-limited countries. The SIAPS Program works to improve the availability and quality of information for decision making through the use of electronic tools combined with systems strengthening.

 

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Strengthening the Department of Health’s Warehouse Management System in the Philippines

The goal of warehouse operations is to satisfy client needs and requirements while effectively utilizing space, equipment, and labor. Warehouse management refers to the monitoring, control, and optimization of warehouse and transportation systems. The objectives of this assessment were to review the existing warehouse management system, including space, equipment, tools, and processes, and identify key requirements and technical specifications for the implementation of WMS technology that is tailored to the Republic of the Philippines’ public health supply system needs.

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SIAPS Showcases Key Approaches at Africa’s Medicine Regulation Conference, Accra, Ghana

The 3rd Biennial Scientific Conference on Medical Products Regulation in Africa (SCOMRA), which took place November 27–28, 2017, in Accra, Ghana, focused on “Sustaining the Momentum for Regulatory Harmonization in Africa.” Participants and presenters shared their experiences and lessons learned to contribute to the future of medical products regulation and harmonization in Africa. Staff from the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program presented posters highlighting the program’s work and key findings. SIAPS’s participation in the conference was critical for highlighting the support the program has offered countries to strengthen their medicine regulatory systems since 2011.

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Strengthening the Supply Chain Governance Framework for Pharmaceuticals and Health Products in the Philippines – Technical Brief

The Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Project, funded by the US Agency for International Development, helps countries promote access to safe, quality, and cost-effective pharmaceuticals and health commodities by using a system strengthening approach that engages stakeholders, builds and strengthens existing health systems, or establishes a new one, if necessary. SIAPS strengthens pharmaceutical governance by working with the Department of Health and all in-country stakeholders involved in managing the supply chain to define roles, responsibilities, and accountability as well as to identify the critical steps moving forward to implement positive changes in the system. SIAPS ensures the involvement of all partners during the whole process. The overall goal is to promote stewardship for DOH and enable continuous, sustained progress.

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Strengthening Governance in Procurement in Bangladesh

Despite being one of the most densely populated countries in the world, the overall health in Bangladesh has steadily improved over the last 30 years. While the Government of Bangladesh’s efforts have resulted in impressive gains in public health, weaknesses in pharmaceutical management, including logistics and supplies, infrastructure, and the low performance of health care providers, remain obstacles to obtaining access to efficacious medicines and quality health services, particularly for the poor. SIAPS has been working closely with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) since 2011 to implement a series of systems strengthening interventions to support the government’s health objectives. Using a systems-based approach, SIAPS catalyzes effective leadership, good governance, and evidence-based decision making to strengthen procurement and supply chain systems.

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Developing Better Terms of Reference to Improve the Performance of Pharmaceutical Sector Committees: Case Studies from South Africa

In South Africa, there are numerous governance structures that make crucial decisions about selection, procurement, distribution, and use of medicines, diagnostics, and other pharmaceutical products. A challenge commonly encountered is that critical committees either do not exist or where the committee is in place, it does not function optimally. One of the most underlying causes of poor functioning of committees is the absence of or weak terms of reference (TOR). In 2015, the Affordable Medicines Directorate (AMD) of South Africa’s National Department of Health (NDOH), requested assistance from SIAPS in strengthening the TOR of several national committees, including those involved in selection of medicines for inclusion on the National Essential Medicines List (NEML). SIAPS developed a TOR guidance document that can be used in the development or review of TOR. The purpose of this brief is to share the guidance document and the processes SIAPS and their counterparts followed to develop new and revise existing TOR for three different pharmaceutical sector committees in South Africa.

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Supporting drug and therapeutics committees in Sierra Leone to promote safe, appropriate medicine use

Irrational medicine use and poor pharmaceutical management at all levels are widespread problems in many developing countries, including Sierra Leone. Misuse, underuse, and overuse of medicines; weak systems that compromise medicine safety; the waste of scarce resources due to expiry; and the rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) are particularly worrying because they directly affect health outcomes. Because of a lack of sound data for decision making, health workers may need to select products for medicines lists, supply, and prescribing based on observation and preferences. SIAPS is facilitating the selection of appropriate, safe products to be procured and used at different levels of the public health system. Promoting rational medicine use cuts down on waste, improves health outcomes, and helps prevent the spread of AMR.

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Strengthening the Pharmaceutical System in Sierra Leone after Ebola

SIAPS received two years of funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in September 2015 to provide technical assistance to rebuild and strengthen the post-Ebola pharmaceutical supply chain management system and improve the supply chain and rational medicine use in Sierra Leone. To support these goals, SIAPS provides technical assistance for systems strengthening activities including governance and leadership, supply chain management and information for decision making.

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Sierra Leone Project Update: Developing a Commodity Dashboard to Track Medicine Stock and Related Health Data

To take systems strengthening support to the next level, SIAPS is introducing a web-based enhanced information graphic display platform. The dashboard features data from each health facility and supply structure and will provide real-time access to patient and commodity information. The end goal is for the dashboard to be used to visualize graphic data on health programs, patient uptake, and stock status in about 1,300 health facilities in all districts of the country.

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The Economic Cost of Non-adherence to TB Medicines Resulting from Stock-outs and Loss to Follow-up in Kenya – Research Summary

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, which is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence results in increased length and severity of illness, death, disease transmission, and drug resistance. Treatment interruption is often due to patient-related factors—classed as loss to follow-up (LTFU)—but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of medicines. The purpose of this study was to estimate the morbidity, mortality, and economic impact of TB treatment interruption due to stock-outs and LTFU. The results are expected to help promote the benefits of ensuring the availability of good quality medicines and of undertaking interventions to reduce LTFU.

For the full report, please follow this link.

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