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Benin National Supply Chain Assessment

In an effort to improve the health status of the Beninese population, a priority activity included in the 2015 convention between the US Government, represented by USAID, and the Benin Government, represented by the Ministry of Health (MOH), was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the public health supply chain, focused on essential medicines that are associated with the package of low-cost, high-impact interventions. SIAPS undertook this assessment in close collaboration with and under the leadership of the MOH, represented by the National Health Products Supply Chain. This report presents information on the capability, maturity, and operational performance of Benin’s health supply system, along with a strategic plan of interventions to address identified weaknesses that will allow reliable supply and use of medicines in the health system.

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Country policy development for chlorhexidine 7.1% introduction for umbilical cord care

This policy guidance document is divided into 13 different areas:

  • Country policy development
  • Registration
  • Planning
  • Financing
  • Revised program guidelines, Essential Medicines List (EML), and reporting and recording forms
  • Training of health workers and community partners (community health worker/relais)
  • ACSM strategies
  • Forecasting and quantification
  • Procurement
  • Distribution
  • Health system strengthening
  • Quality and safety
  • Monitoring and evaluation
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Strengthening the Department of Health’s Warehouse Management System in the Philippines

The goal of warehouse operations is to satisfy client needs and requirements while effectively utilizing space, equipment, and labor. Warehouse management refers to the monitoring, control, and optimization of warehouse and transportation systems. The objectives of this assessment were to review the existing warehouse management system, including space, equipment, tools, and processes, and identify key requirements and technical specifications for the implementation of WMS technology that is tailored to the Republic of the Philippines’ public health supply system needs.

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Training on Pharmaceutical and Medical Commodities Supply Chain Management in Humanitarian Response Settings

Most NGOs and partners who work with OFDA face significant challenges in pharmaceutical procurement and supply chain management (SCM) as well as difficulties complying with OFDA policies, procedures, and funding/donation requirements. OFDA seeks to ensure excellence in its operations and programs and continues to push for significant changes to establish a humanitarian aid system that is more nimble, effective, and accountable. To accomplish this, OFDA requested technical assistance from SIAPS to develop training materials and facilitate two rounds of training for staff of its collaborating humanitarian aid partners and local and international NGOs. This training will help to ensure that appropriate procurement and SCM is implemented for the delivery of quality-assured pharmaceuticals and medical commodities to conflict-affected, internal, and cross-border displaced people. The objectives of the training program were to build the capacity of humanitarian aid partner staff on humanitarian SCM for the effective delivery of pharmaceuticals and medical commodities.

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Strengthening Governance in Procurement in Bangladesh

Despite being one of the most densely populated countries in the world, the overall health in Bangladesh has steadily improved over the last 30 years. While the Government of Bangladesh’s efforts have resulted in impressive gains in public health, weaknesses in pharmaceutical management, including logistics and supplies, infrastructure, and the low performance of health care providers, remain obstacles to obtaining access to efficacious medicines and quality health services, particularly for the poor. SIAPS has been working closely with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) since 2011 to implement a series of systems strengthening interventions to support the government’s health objectives. Using a systems-based approach, SIAPS catalyzes effective leadership, good governance, and evidence-based decision making to strengthen procurement and supply chain systems.

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Procedimientos Operativos de Adquisición de CEAS

El SUGEMI, es el conjunto de procesos y recursos del sistema de salud orientados a garantizar la disponibilidad y uso racional de produc­tos de calidad. Es un sistema que integrará las diferentes modalidades de suministro de medicamentos e insumos de salud, existentes en los Centros del primer nivel de atención (CPN) y Centros Especializados de Atención en Salud (CEAS) del segundo y tercer nivel, bajo una sola administración. Tiene por objetivo final mejorar la accesibilidad de la población a medicamentos esenciales de calidad, promoviendo a la vez la racionalidad en su utilización. Con este fin se han desarrollado una serie de documentos pertenecientes a los procedimientos operativos de la gestión del suministro de los CEAS, para el fortalecimiento de los Servicios de Farmacia Hospitalaria (SFH), que servirán como herramientas de gestión estándares para una prestación de servicios farmacéuticos eficiente y de calidad.

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Establishing Pooled Procurement Systems among Faith-Based Organizations: A Guidance Document for Successful Implementation

Faith-based organizations play a vital role in many developing countries in ensuring access to essential medicines and delivering health services to patients. This is particularly the case in rural areas, where public health facilities do not exist or are inadequate. However, many faith-based organizations face challenges with providing a continuous supply and reliable availability of essential medicines. The influx of poor-quality (counterfeit) medicines on the African continent is also a growing challenge. Furthermore, weak regulatory systems, poor enforcement of regulatory laws, and challenges associated with procurement and distribution of medicines by faith-based organization in many countries have resulted in varying approaches and designs of procurement mechanisms in this sector that are inefficient and not cost-effective.

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Logistics Management Units Improve Availability of Medicines in Bangladesh

Absence of coordination mechanisms, lack of comprehensive guidelines, vertical programs and systems, and duplication of procurement practices impede effective procurement of medicines and health products in developing countries, frequently resulting in either too few or too many products on hand. In many low- and middle-income countries, such as Bangladesh, the logistics and management capabilities and systems are not sufficient to meet basic globally accepted standards and norms. However, pharmaceutical logistics management units offer a platform to help ensure not only a continuous supply of medicines and health supplies, but also coordinate procurement activities across the range of stakeholders involved, and build donor support by providing accurate data for decision making.

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Financing for the Procurement of Medicines and Supplies for the Diagnosis and Treatment of HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republican

In 2012, the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program carried out a study that concluded there was a USD 2.5 million financial gap for providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) to 22,440 patients who were hoped to be covered in 2013. This estimate included an expanded security stock that would avoid scarcities caused by delays in purchases or shipments. The presentation and discussion of this study with authorities and specialists from the Ministry of Public Health (Ministerio de Salud Pública, or MSP), the National Council on HIV/AIDS (Consejo Nacional del VIH/SIDA, or CONAVIHSIDA), and international aid agencies allowed the referenced financial gaps to be closed by means of better price negotiation with international suppliers and the first-time allocation of USD 1.9 million for the purchase of ARVs in the MSP budget. In 2013 only USD 350,000 was required from PEPFAR to cover shortages in supplies.

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Quantification of Health Commodities: RMNCH Supplement

This guide will assist program managers, service providers, and technical experts when conducting a quantification of commodity needs for the 13 reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health commodities prioritized by the UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children.

These 13 commodities have diverse characteristics: some are new products that are in the process of being introduced at scale and some are products that have been in use for many years but are under-used or not available when needed or in the recommended formulation. However, one commonality shared by all is the need to increase access to these commodities among the women and children who need or want them. A major component of access is availability and to ensure availability, accurate estimates of supply requirements are needed. At the global level, this information can inform both donors’ plans for procurement and manufacturers’ plans for production. At the national level, this information is also essential for budgeting, resource mobilization, and planning for procurement and supply chain operations.

Currently, accurate estimates of need are unavailable for many of the 13 commodities at either the global or national levels. Therefore, many of the Commission’s work plans have included activities related to collecting this information through market sizing or quantification exercises. The Commission’s 2012 report also notes that improved quantification efforts are needed as part of supply chain improvement. This guide provides practical guidance on estimating the quantities of supplies needed by programs as part of a national quantification exercise. While this guidance was developed primarily for public sector and NGO programs, the methodology presented could also be relevant for forecasting commodity needs for the private sector.

This is the updated version of the guide, published in January 2016. The original was published in 2014. 

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