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Rapport de l’enquête sur la vérification de l’utilisation finale des produits de lutte contre le paludisme au Mali, août 9-29, 2017

La présente édition de l’EUV a été réalisée août 9-29, 2017, sous la direction du PNLP dans les régions du sud du Mali. L’objectif de l’étude est de contribuer à améliorer la disponibilité, la gestion, et l’utilisation des médicaments et autres intrants antipaludiques dans les structures sanitaires publiques et parapubliques du Mali. C’est une étude de type transversal et descriptif qui s’est intéressée aux points de prestation de soins, ainsi qu’aux points de distribution et de dispensation des intrants antipaludiques dans les structures sanitaires des régions de Kayes, Koulikoro, Sikasso, Ségou, Mopti, et le district de Bamako.

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Assessment of DPM Medicine Regulatory System, Mali

A comprehensive assessment of DPM’s medicine regulatory system was conducted September to October 2017 by SIAPS funded by USAID. The WHO Global Benchmarking Tool was used for data collection. The scope of the assessment was focused on the five regulatory functions: national regulatory systems, medicines registration and marketing authorization (MA), pharmacovigilance (PV), market surveillance and control, and clinical trial oversight (CTO).

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Disposal Initiative Allows Bangladesh Hospital to Reclaim Space, Reduce Health Risks

In Bangladesh, the Ministry’s Procurement and Logistics Management Cell (PLMC) made an assessment of the status of medical equipment that was no longer usable and explored the logistics in health facilities across the country to accelerate the disposal process. The PLMC and SIAPS conducted seven divisional workshops on condemnation of medical and non-medical items for all district- and sub-district-level health managers under the MoHFW to share the assessment findings, the disposal process, and how that process could be improved for effective logistics management as part of a hospital management system.

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Strengthening the Department of Health’s Warehouse Management System in the Philippines

The goal of warehouse operations is to satisfy client needs and requirements while effectively utilizing space, equipment, and labor. Warehouse management refers to the monitoring, control, and optimization of warehouse and transportation systems. The objectives of this assessment were to review the existing warehouse management system, including space, equipment, tools, and processes, and identify key requirements and technical specifications for the implementation of WMS technology that is tailored to the Republic of the Philippines’ public health supply system needs.

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Strengthening the Supply Chain Governance Framework for Pharmaceuticals and Health Products in the Philippines – Technical Brief

The Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Project, funded by the US Agency for International Development, helps countries promote access to safe, quality, and cost-effective pharmaceuticals and health commodities by using a system strengthening approach that engages stakeholders, builds and strengthens existing health systems, or establishes a new one, if necessary. SIAPS strengthens pharmaceutical governance by working with the Department of Health and all in-country stakeholders involved in managing the supply chain to define roles, responsibilities, and accountability as well as to identify the critical steps moving forward to implement positive changes in the system. SIAPS ensures the involvement of all partners during the whole process. The overall goal is to promote stewardship for DOH and enable continuous, sustained progress.

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Strengthening the Supply Chain Governance Framework for Pharmaceuticals and Health Products in the Philippines

The Department of Health (DOH) is ultimately responsible and accountable for ensuring that Filipinos have access to quality health services. An effective supply chain is essential for DOH to ensure that lifesaving health products are available, accessible, and effectively used for clients.  Recently, the DOH has shown its commitment by creating the Supply Chain Management Unit (SCMU) in March 2016. SIAPS conducted a thorough desk review of previous assessments and DOH’s various internal SCM policies. SIAPS also helped coordinate meetings with various DOH offices to identify and validate current experiences in SCM and to obtain recommendations to strengthen SCM governance of DOH.

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Assessment of the Neglected Tropical Diseases Pharmaceutical Management System in Senegal

Supply chain constraints plague current neglected tropical disease (NTD) prevention and treatment programs. The rapid expansion of NTD control activities has not been without pharmaceutical and health system challenges. Inadequate NTD drug management in many countries has resulted in excess stocks, leading to waste resulting from drug expiry or stock-outs, leading to treatment interruption. SIAPS has received funding from USAID to support the Senegal MoH in strengthening the systems for NTD pharmaceutical management. The purpose of the technical assistance is to undertake a rapid assessment of the NTD pharmaceutical management system and understand the integration efforts. Technical review and recommendations have been provided by SIAPS personnel based in the SIAPS West Africa Offices and the office in Arlington, Virginia. SIAPS held meetings with the MoH NTD focal points and supply chain managers to ensure efficient delivery of technical support to the NTD programs, cross fertilization, sharing of lessons learned, challenges, and recommendations and to ensure that the implemented interventions are of the highest technical quality that focuses on country objectives.

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Challenges to Ensuring Adequate and Timely Funding for MNCH Commodities

As countries pursue the maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) targets established under Sustainable Development Goal 3, they will need to ensure the continuous availability of essential health commodities to prevent and treat the conditions that cause morbidity and mortality in those groups. Since the report of the United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC) was published in 2012, much progress has been made to highlight the challenges countries face in ensuring access to essential commodities and to create resources to overcome these challenges. A major issue yet to be adequately addressed is financing for these life-saving commodities. SIAPS mapped the budget allocation, approval, disbursement, and reporting processes in the public sector for essential MNCH commodities in four countries—
Bangladesh, Kenya, Nepal, and Uganda—to inform the development of strategies and
interventions that will improve access to these commodities.

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Assessing Sub-National Procurement Practices of Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Commodities in Kenya

The SIAPS Program works at both the global and country levels to improve pharmaceutical management systems that increase access to quality medicines. SIAPS has developed a methodology to assess sub-national procurement practices. This methodology was used in Kenya to assess county-level procurement practices for essential maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) commodities and to study the availability of essential MNCH commodities. The information gathered was used to generate recommendations to strengthen local procurement practices and overall procurement strategies.

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Pediatric Antiretroviral Treatment Uptake, Treatment Adherence, Regimen Switches, and Retention in Care in Namibia

In Namibia, a preliminary review of EDT records suggests that children form a small proportion of the patients accessing ART in any given setting, nationally composing 8% of the patients on ART in the MoHSS facilities. Over the years, managing children has been complicated with formulations that have not been friendly for children, complicated regimens, and occasional stock-outs of pediatric ARVs. These challenges may increase the number of children that might receive suboptimal care, including delayed or no interventions in face of poor adherence, ultimately leading to suboptimal response to treatment. This can then increase the risk of HIV drug resistance and leads to short survival of HIV-infected children. Findings from this assessment will provide much needed evidence on trends in pediatric HIV treatment uptake, levels of adherence, and retention among those on treatment. Ultimately, the evidence generated will support MoHSS policy makers and leaders in modifying and strengthening interventions aimed at enhancing treatment uptake, adherence, retention, and viral load suppression among HIV-infected children in Namibia.

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