Tag Archives | TB

Introduction of new TB medicines and regimens: An opportunity to strengthen pharmaceutical systems

New medicines and regimens, such as bedaquiline, delamanid, and the newly approved short course regimen, are an exciting development given that first- and second-line TB medicines have limited efficacy and potentially serious adverse effects. With the introduction of new TB medicines and regimens, some countries may target only the minimum WHO-recommended conditions (i.e., proper patient […]

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The tuberculosis profile of the Philippines, 2003–2011: advancing DOTS and beyond

Vianzon R, Celina Garfin AM, Lagos A, Belen R. The tuberculosis profile of the Philippines, 2003-2011: Advancing DOTS and beyond. Surveillance Report. 2013.

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Focus on Priority and Emerging Health Issues

Comprehensive strategies and actions for monitoring the safety of medicines are essential to a well-functioning pharmaceutical sector. The links below highlight recent SIAPS Program work in priority and emerging health issues to strengthen health systems. SIAPS Voices series “You can’t achieve UHC without thinking about gender” In public health, when you’re designing an intervention you’re […]

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SIAPS Annual Report: Program Year 5

Systems thinking is now a widely accepted concept in global health. Governments, donors, and other actors in global health recognize that guaranteeing the availability of medicines is a necessary, but insufficient component to improving health outcomes. Rather, medicines availability must be bolstered by other components, such as ensuring that quality medicines are available and prescribed and dispensed appropriately by health care workers; patients must also use medicines properly. In order to achieve improvements in health for their populations and address health inequities, governments and donors must invest in strengthening health systems. A health system depends on its subcomponent, a pharmaceutical system, for the continuous availability of safe, effective, and affordable essential medicines and other health technologies of assured quality to deliver effective health interventions that improve health outcomes. This is in alignment with USAID’s Vision for Health Systems Strengthening (2015-2019). To this end, the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program focuses on achieving positive health outcomes by assuring the availability of quality pharmaceutical products and effective pharmaceutical services.

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Technical Brief: Strengthening Namibia’s Pharmacy Sector and Workforce

Namibia faces a dual public health burden of HIV and AIDS and tuberculosis (TB). Critical to the treatment and management of these diseases is an effective workforce that can provide quality pharmaceutical services throughout the country. Pharmacists and pharmacist assistants (PAs) play critical roles in dispensing life-saving medications, monitoring patient health and progress, and educating both patients and other health professionals about proper medication use, storage, and dispensing practices. To meet the high demand for quality pharmaceutical services and to ensure that pharmacy personnel needs are being met, the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program supported the Government of the Republic of Namibia in the long-term planning of pharmaceutical human resources and building the capacity of two local institutions to provide pre-service and in-service pharmaceutical management training.

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Economic Cost of Non-Adherence to TB Medicines Resulting from Stock-Outs and Loss to Follow-Up in the Philippines

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, and this is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence is often due to patient-related factors, but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of TB medicines. Non-adherence results in increases in length and severity of illness, deaths, disease transmission, and drug resistance. These have economic consequences in terms of costs and loss of income for patients and their families and also costs to the health system.

 

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Medical Refrigerators Improve Storage Condition at the Peripheral Level and Ensure Quality of Tuberculosis Medicines: Lessons Learned and Opportunities

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), poor-quality medicines and inadequate storage conditions are among the contributing factors that result in poor tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcomes and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The recommended temperature to retain the quality of TB medicines is below 25°C, but at the peripheral level in Bangladesh, most TB medicines are stored at the Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) centers of the upazila (subdistrict) health complexes (UHCs) or in the implementing nongovernmental partners’ facilities, where the storage facilities consist of wood or steel lockable cabinets. These cabinets cannot ensure the ideal storage temperature and therefore put expensive and sensitive TB medicines at risk of degradation. In 2012, the US Agency for International Development-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, implemented by Management Sciences for Health, conducted a rapid assessment of TB pharmaceutical management in Bangladesh. One recommendation in the assessment report was that options should be considered for lowering the storage temperature at facilities at the upazila level. Both the fifth and sixth Joint Monitoring Missions of the National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP), conducted in 2010 and 2014, respectively, put forth recommendations to improve storage standards at the upazila level; however, due to a lack of funding, the NTP could not implement these recommendations.

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Bedaquiline Treatment Reaches 200 Patients in Georgia

Georgia is one of the first countries to benefit from the USAID‑Janssen Therapeutics bedaquiline (BDQ) donation program. Along with delamanid, BDQ is one of only two new TB medicines released to the market in over 40 years. These medicines are being used for the treatment of MDR-TB patients, as well as TB patients who have […]

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World TB Day 2016: Celebrating Successes and Lessons Learned in Swaziland

In 2012, bedaquiline was conditionally approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), making it the first new TB drug to enter the market in more than 40 years. With the rise of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant TB leaving patients with fewer treatment options, the approval of bedaquiline […]

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New hope for treating drug-resistant TB in Swaziland: An interview with Khontile Kunene

 In April 2015, USAID and Janssen Therapeutics officially launched the bedaquiline (BDQ) donation initiative, under which Janssen committed to providing free BDQ to 30,000 patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) over a four-year period. Along with delamanid, BDQ is one of only two new TB medicines released to the market in over 40 years. These medicines […]

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