Tag Archives | pharmaceutical financing

Country policy development for chlorhexidine 7.1% introduction for umbilical cord care

This policy guidance document is divided into 13 different areas:

  • Country policy development
  • Registration
  • Planning
  • Financing
  • Revised program guidelines, Essential Medicines List (EML), and reporting and recording forms
  • Training of health workers and community partners (community health worker/relais)
  • ACSM strategies
  • Forecasting and quantification
  • Procurement
  • Distribution
  • Health system strengthening
  • Quality and safety
  • Monitoring and evaluation
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SIAPS by the Numbers

This infographic provides an overview of select SIAPS interventions and results in line with six core health system functions: governance; capacity building; information for decision-making; financing; supply chain; and pharmaceutical services.

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Pharmaceutical management considerations for expanded coverage of essential health services and financial protection programs

The UN adoption of the SDGs in 2015 signaled a strong commitment of member countries to the expanded access to essential health service agenda and definitively recognized the critical role of medicines in achieving UHC. The SDGs call for countries to “achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all”. This paper seeks to highlight the key functional areas of pharmaceutical management, the critical components of the pharmaceutical system, and the management considerations needed to facilitate the attainment of UHC targets.

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Mapping the Financial Flow and Expenditures for Select MNCH Medicines in Uganda

Since the report of the United Nations Commission on Life-saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC) was published in 2012, much has been done to highlight the challenges countries face in ensuring the availability of essential commodities and to create resources to assist countries in this endeavor. In most settings, these commodities are procured with government funds, but there is a lack of documented evidence as to how decisions regarding financing for these commodities are made and executed. An understanding of the financial flows for MNCH commodities is critical as countries pursue the goals of ending preventable child and maternal deaths and of universal health coverage and as many go through processes of decentralization. Understanding financial flows for MNCH commodities may also assist the donor community in making smarter investments and assisting countries in mobilizing additional resources. The US Agency for International Development (USAID) commissioned this study in Bangladesh, Nepal, Kenya, and Uganda.

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Mapping the Financial Flow and Expenditures for Select MNCH Medicines in Kenya

Since the report of the United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC) was published in 2012, much has been done to highlight the challenges countries face in ensuring the availability of essential commodities and to create resources to assist countries in this endeavor. In most settings, these commodities are procured with government funds, but there is a lack of documented evidence as to how decisions regarding financing for these commodities are made and executed. An understanding of the financial flows for MNCH commodities is critical as countries pursue the goals of ending preventable child and maternal deaths and of universal health coverage and as many go through the process of decentralization. Understanding financial flows for MNCH commodities may also assist the donor community in making smarter investments and assisting countries in mobilizing additional resources. SIAPS conducted an assessment of subnational procurement practices in Kenya. One component of that assessment is related to understanding the financial flows for MNCH commodities.

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Mapping the Financial Flow and Expenditures for Select MNCH Medicines in Bangladesh

Since the report of the United Nations Commission on Life-saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC) was published in 2012, much has been done to highlight the challenges countries face in ensuring the availability of essential commodities and to create resources to assist countries in this endeavor. In most settings, these commodities are procured with government funds, but there is a lack of documented evidence as to how decisions regarding financing for these commodities are made and executed. An understanding of the financial flows for MNCH commodities is critical as countries pursue the goals of ending preventable child and maternal deaths and of universal health coverage and as many go through processes of decentralization. Understanding financial flows for MNCH commodities may also assist the donor community in making smarter investments and assisting countries in mobilizing additional resources. The US Agency for International Development (USAID) commissioned this study in Bangladesh, Nepal, Kenya, and Uganda.

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Guide to Tracking Pharmaceutical Expenditures in a Health System

This guide is designed to take country-level pharmaceutical and financing experts through the System of Health Accounts (SHA) framework as a potential approach that can be adapted to track pharmaceutical expenditures. The guide also reviews important first steps that must be considered to operationalize pharmaceutical expenditure tracking. It is intended to serve as a foundation for a wider conversation about pharmaceutical expenditure tracking approaches and to bring attention to key normative issues including expenditure definitions and boundaries that will need to be addressed before full-scale implementation guidelines for pharmaceutical expenditure tracking can be fully adopted.

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The Economic Cost of Non-adherence to TB Medicines Resulting from Stock-outs and Loss to Follow-up in Kenya – Research Summary

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, which is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence results in increased length and severity of illness, death, disease transmission, and drug resistance. Treatment interruption is often due to patient-related factors—classed as loss to follow-up (LTFU)—but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of medicines. The purpose of this study was to estimate the morbidity, mortality, and economic impact of TB treatment interruption due to stock-outs and LTFU. The results are expected to help promote the benefits of ensuring the availability of good quality medicines and of undertaking interventions to reduce LTFU.

For the full report, please follow this link.

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The Economic Cost of Non-adherence to TB Medicines Resulting from Stock-outs and Loss to Follow-up in Kenya

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, which is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence results in increased length and severity of illness, death, disease transmission, and drug resistance. Treatment interruption is often due to patient-related factors—classed as loss to follow-up (LTFU)—but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of medicines. The purpose of this study was to estimate the morbidity, mortality, and economic impact of TB treatment interruption due to stock-outs and LTFU. The results are expected to help promote the benefits of ensuring the availability of good quality medicines and of undertaking interventions to reduce LTFU.

For the research summary, please follow this link.

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Ethiopian National Health Insurance Scale-Up Assessment on Medicines Financing, Use, and Benefit Management

An assessment on current pharmaceutical financing, SHI and CBHI medicines coverage, and public and private sector medicines prescribing and dispensing and their costs was conducted. The SCMS program conducted an assessment that addressed the supply chain and public-private partnership implications of the expected increased demand for quality medicines and related health supplies.

This report presents the findings from the SIAPS assessment, the implications for preparing a proof of concept for launching and implementing the SHI scheme, and the potential for opportunities to engage the private sector.

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