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SIAPS by the Numbers

This infographic provides an overview of select SIAPS interventions and results in line with six core health system functions: governance; capacity building; information for decision-making; financing; supply chain; and pharmaceutical services.

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Evaluation of SIAPS Supportive Supervision and Mentorship Activities

This report presents highlights of SIAPS’ work to capacitate health workers on proper pharmaceutical service delivery and stock management over a four-year period (2012 to 2015). SIAPS did a baseline assessment at health facilities (HF) in 2012, and then from 2013 to 2015, its technical advisors provided assistance to address the identified performance gaps. The objectives of this evaluation were to document results achieved from implementing mentorship and supportive supervision (SS) visits in supply chain management and pharmaceutical services; and present lessons learned from the implementation of these visits.

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The Economic Cost of Non-adherence to TB Medicines Resulting from Stock-outs and Loss to Follow-up in Kenya – Research Summary

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, which is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence results in increased length and severity of illness, death, disease transmission, and drug resistance. Treatment interruption is often due to patient-related factors—classed as loss to follow-up (LTFU)—but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of medicines. The purpose of this study was to estimate the morbidity, mortality, and economic impact of TB treatment interruption due to stock-outs and LTFU. The results are expected to help promote the benefits of ensuring the availability of good quality medicines and of undertaking interventions to reduce LTFU.

For the full report, please follow this link.

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The Economic Cost of Non-adherence to TB Medicines Resulting from Stock-outs and Loss to Follow-up in Kenya

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, which is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence results in increased length and severity of illness, death, disease transmission, and drug resistance. Treatment interruption is often due to patient-related factors—classed as loss to follow-up (LTFU)—but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of medicines. The purpose of this study was to estimate the morbidity, mortality, and economic impact of TB treatment interruption due to stock-outs and LTFU. The results are expected to help promote the benefits of ensuring the availability of good quality medicines and of undertaking interventions to reduce LTFU.

For the research summary, please follow this link.

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Ethiopian National Health Insurance Scale-Up Assessment on Medicines Financing, Use, and Benefit Management

An assessment on current pharmaceutical financing, SHI and CBHI medicines coverage, and public and private sector medicines prescribing and dispensing and their costs was conducted. The SCMS program conducted an assessment that addressed the supply chain and public-private partnership implications of the expected increased demand for quality medicines and related health supplies.

This report presents the findings from the SIAPS assessment, the implications for preparing a proof of concept for launching and implementing the SHI scheme, and the potential for opportunities to engage the private sector.

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National Drug Service Organization: Analysis of Markups, Income, and Costs, 2007–2012

The SIAPS Program provided technical assistance to analyze recent NDSO operational costs and income trends and provide guidance on adjustments to existing markups to optimize the organization’s operational liquidity to sustain quality services and products. The study team analyzed or calculated selected financial and operational performance indicators from data in NDSO department reports, in annual financial statements (for the past five years), or extracted from NDSO’s information system, the RxSolution database.

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Systems-based Approaches to Improving Medication Adherence

With the shift from a disease landscape that focuses on the treatment of acute and short-term illnesses to one that faces an increasing burden of chronic diseases that may require life-long medicine use, the role of medicines in ensuring a healthy population is more important than ever.

However,even when medicines are available, patients may not take them as directed. In other words, they may not adhere to the treatment prescribed to them. This problem is surprisingly widespread. Several studies have estimated that in developed countries, only approximately 50% of patients who suffer from chronic diseases take their medicines as directed.

This document suggests a health systems strengthening (HSS) approach to addressing
medication adherence issues, with a particular emphasis on its application in low- and middle-income settings. Chapter 2 reviews the importance of considering health systems in improving medication adherence and introduces a system-based framework, while Chapters 3–5 discuss approaches, interventions, and activities that span the health system as described at the
macro, meso, and micro levels and provide implementation examples.

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Strengthening Regulatory Systems to Improve Access to Safe, Effective, and Quality Medicines

SIAPS technical support has helped strengthen the capacity of the national registration committee and streamline medicines registration. As a result, the number of registered medicines has increased from 200 in 2010 to over 3,000 in 2014; 72% of the medicines included on DRC’s essential medicines list currently have at least one product registered, up from 44% in 2011. The backlog of applications has been completely eliminated and the time taken to process a new application has been reduced from a peak of 85 days in 2013 to 64 days at the end of 2014.

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Modernizing Legislation in Swaziland to Improve the Control of Medicines

The weak regulatory system in Swaziland poses a threat to public health and safety and has been an obstacle in the country’s effort to improve access to quality essential medicines and services for managing HIV, controlling tuberculosis, and delivering other priority public health interventions. The legislation governing the regulation of medicines, pharmaceutical establishments, and the pharmacy profession in Swaziland dates back to 1929 and no longer serves as an effective or relevant legal framework for the pharmaceutical sector. Specifically, the absence of a legal mandate for a national medicines regulatory authority has made it difficult for the government to assure the quality, safety, and efficacy of medicines used in the country.

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Guidance for Planning the Introduction of New Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Medicines and Supplies

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to program managers in ministries of health at national and sub-national levels as well as personnel in other interested organizations on actions to take and factors to consider when expanding access to essential RMNCH commodities. While this document focuses on RMNCH medicines and supplies, it may be used as a guiding document and planning tool for other essential medicines and supplies. This guide addresses several pharmaceutical management issues (pharmaceutical policies, effective medicine management, strengthening regulatory systems, information needs, and product quality and safety practices) that are often overlooked when considering the introduction of new products. The systems strengthening approach described in this document focuses on governance, human resources, information systems, financing, and service delivery, with the provision of medical products cutting across these sub-systems. The goal of this guidance document is to assist managers to systematically plan for the successful introduction of new medicines and supplies by harmonizing and aligning efforts among all stakeholders involved in the process.

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