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Rapport de quantification des produits de la santé reproductive, maternelle, néonatale, et infantile pour la période de janvier 2016 à décembre 2020

L’accès à des médicaments appropriés est vital pour parvenir aux objectifs mondiaux en matière de santé, en particulier les produits destinés pour la santé de la femme et de l’enfant. Un élément majeur de l’accès est de garantir la disponibilité des produits. Pour cela, la quantification des besoins est indispensable. La présente activité a apporté un soutien au Ministère de la Santé et de l’Hygiène Publique (MSHP) pour la quantification des besoins en médicaments pour la santé reproductive, maternelle, néonatale, et infantile (SRMNI). C’est ainsi que la Direction de la Pharmacie et du Médicament (DPM), à travers l’appui technique et financier de SIAPS, a organisé un atelier de quantification des besoins de ces produits. Avec la participation de tous les principaux intervenants dans le but de produire des besoins prévisionnels, un plan d’approvisionnement pour la période de 2016 à 2020 était préparé.

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SIAPS Voices: A new push to improve access to lifesaving medicines for RMNCH

An interview with Sheena Patel, technical advisor for maternal, newborn and child health activities at SIAPS The health of women and children is critical to the overall health and prosperity of a country—and the world. Can you talk a bit about why? The most obvious reason is that when women and children are healthy, they […]

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Focus on Priority and Emerging Health Issues

Comprehensive strategies and actions for monitoring the safety of medicines are essential to a well-functioning pharmaceutical sector. The links below highlight recent SIAPS Program work in priority and emerging health issues to strengthen health systems. SIAPS Voices series “You can’t achieve UHC without thinking about gender” In public health, when you’re designing an intervention you’re […]

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SIAPS Annual Report: Program Year 5

Systems thinking is now a widely accepted concept in global health. Governments, donors, and other actors in global health recognize that guaranteeing the availability of medicines is a necessary, but insufficient component to improving health outcomes. Rather, medicines availability must be bolstered by other components, such as ensuring that quality medicines are available and prescribed and dispensed appropriately by health care workers; patients must also use medicines properly. In order to achieve improvements in health for their populations and address health inequities, governments and donors must invest in strengthening health systems. A health system depends on its subcomponent, a pharmaceutical system, for the continuous availability of safe, effective, and affordable essential medicines and other health technologies of assured quality to deliver effective health interventions that improve health outcomes. This is in alignment with USAID’s Vision for Health Systems Strengthening (2015-2019). To this end, the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program focuses on achieving positive health outcomes by assuring the availability of quality pharmaceutical products and effective pharmaceutical services.

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Every Breath Counts: Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems for Better Health Outcomes with Pneumonia

By Jane Briggs, Principal Technical Advisor More than 900,000 children die of pneumonia each year (more than malaria, measles, and HIV/AIDS combined), according to the World Health Organization. Many of these cases go undiagnosed and untreated. How can this be when we know what works? A five-day, twice-daily amoxicillin regimen—in either dispersible tablet (DT) or oral […]

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Guidance on Elements to Consider when Planning for the Integration of Oxytocin into the EPI Cold Chain

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to national program managers who are considering integrating oxytocin into the EPI cold chain. It is intended for representatives from relevant offices of the Ministry of Health (MoH), such as Pharmacy, Central Medical Stores, and Maternal and Child Health, as well as other policy makers, stakeholders, and implementing partners.

This guidance document introduces the pharmaceutical management elements that must be considered to successfully integrate oxytocin into the EPI cold chain and outlines the steps that will help national program managers plan the integration processes and strategies. Integrating oxytocin into the EPI cold chain may affect several elements within the pharmaceutical management cycle, from distribution systems, inventory management, and logistics management information systems and reporting procedures to roles and responsibilities, health facility infrastructure, and monitoring and evaluation. Some elements of the pharmaceutical system are afterthoughts that are only considered when challenges arise during implementation. Taking into account all elements that will be impacted by integrating oxytocin into a supply chain will not only help identify issues but also address needed changes in standard operating procedures and at the various stages of the supply chain. It is important to consider each element and address it in the strategy and implementation plan to ensure that oxytocin integration into the EPI cold chain is successful.

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Now Available: RMNCH Quantification Supplement Webinar Recording

The UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities (UNCoLSC) Supply Chain Technical Resource Team developed a quantification supplement covering 13 underused reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health commodities with great lifesaving potential. These 13 commodities, prioritized by the UNCoLSC, have diverse characteristics: some are new products in the process of being introduced, while others have been in […]

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Publication Highlight: Improving Medicines Access and Use for Child Health—A Guide to Developing Interventions

Improving Medicines Access and Use for Child Health—A Guide to Developing Interventions represents an up-to-date[i] and practical resource for those developing interventions to improve access to and use of medicines for child illness. While it primarily targets groups working in community organizations, health facilities, and district health offices, it could also be used within the […]

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Guidance for Planning the Introduction of New Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Medicines and Supplies

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to program managers in ministries of health at national and sub-national levels as well as personnel in other interested organizations on actions to take and factors to consider when expanding access to essential RMNCH commodities. While this document focuses on RMNCH medicines and supplies, it may be used as a guiding document and planning tool for other essential medicines and supplies. This guide addresses several pharmaceutical management issues (pharmaceutical policies, effective medicine management, strengthening regulatory systems, information needs, and product quality and safety practices) that are often overlooked when considering the introduction of new products. The systems strengthening approach described in this document focuses on governance, human resources, information systems, financing, and service delivery, with the provision of medical products cutting across these sub-systems. The goal of this guidance document is to assist managers to systematically plan for the successful introduction of new medicines and supplies by harmonizing and aligning efforts among all stakeholders involved in the process.

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Analysis of Bottlenecks Related to Demand, Supply, and Use of Antibiotics for the Treatment of Neonatal Sepsis in the DRC

This study was initiated by the Direction de la Santé de la Famille et de Groupes Spécifiques (D10) and the Ministry of Public Health and carried out with technical and financial assistance from the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) and Integrated Health Project (PROSANI-Plus) implemented by Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The study stems from the many efforts by the Government and its partners to reduce maternal, infant, and, specifically, neonatal mortality.

Funding for the study, the report, and its dissemination was obtained from the Global Technical Reference Team for injectable antibiotics through the convener of the group, Save the Children.

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